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20130112
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on what some catholic school systems are doing to try to survive? >> our educational system was imploding. enrollment-wise, finance wise, something radical, radical surgery had to be done. >> announcer: major funding for "religion & ethics news weekly" is dedicated to i founder's interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual group and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. the january henson foundation, and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. arguments continue over the so-called "fiscal cliff" deal approved this week in the fina minutes of the 112th congress. and religious groups are among those weighing in. the family research council criticized the deal for not including spending cuts and entitlement reforms. meanwhile, leaders of the christian group bread for the world said while the measure isn't perfect, they believe it will "prevent major economic damage that would have affected hungry and poo
, and higher education. is this a good thing or bad thing? >> i don't think it's something we need to get too alarmed about right now. there are many factors that contribute it to. one hispanics have highest unemployment rate between 110-13 rate where you have seen the decline. but also cultural thing. as more women get educated and more are in the workforce they are not having the eight kids that my grandmother had now women limit to two or three. a combination of the economy, plus the fact that they're getting a higher education has led to this. i wouldn't get alarmed we're growing at very fast rate. just last ten years we've doubled hispanic population by 2050 we're estimated to be at 12 million. i would say we're watching the situation but it's not an alarming rate yet. >> this is really very -- a very american thing if you think about it. >> notice when this decline stronger than we expected earlier than we expected, when it began, coincides almost exactly with the coming of the recession. and emigrants when they first come to this country repeat the pattern of their home countries they
on traditional liberal arts education. . >> woodruff: ray suarez looks into china's current crackdown on the internet and on its own news media, which is drawing protests. >> ifill: and we remember pulitzer prize-winning journalist richard ben cramer, whose work spanned presidential politics and the lives of superstar athletes. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: saving for the heart. you'll be able to get close to iconic landmarks. to cultural places. it's a feeling that you can only get. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world viking river cruises, explore the world >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank y. >> woodruff: the renewed concern over mass shootings
children are taking to them naturally. they are using smart phones and the educational apps designed for them to get smarter. >> reporter: the 31-year-old and her daughter live in tokyo. she's just a year and ten months old but already he's preoccupied with mom's smartphone. this app is favorite. she touches a drawing of an animal. a photo pops up on screen and then it makes a sound. the apps maker made it to advance the intellect of young children. she started playing with the phone two or three months after she was born. now she uses six different educational apps. >> translator: it's really helpful for times when i can't give her my complete attention or when she starts throwing a tantrum in public. i hand this to her and she gives it all her attention. >> reporter: the youngsters at this nursery school are also going digital. turn the power on please. they use tablets for learning. the apps teach the children to write the japanese alphabet by tracing their fingers along the characters. more than ever teachers and parents are turning to these devices to help them raise children. a
to help ung oplearound the world get a higher education. >>> for decades ethnic minorities from myanmar fled conflict with the former military government to seek refuge in thailand. for many refugee camps are the only home they've ever known. they grew up and went to school in the camps, learning their own ethnic language. but with reconciliation under way in myanmar, educators face a new challenge. how to prepare for the day when the refugees can go home. nhk world's toshiyuki terazawa has the story. >> reporter: children attend an elementary school at the refugee camp in thailand, near the border with myanmar. the camp houses ethnic -- who have left myanmar. refugees have lived in this camp for decades. over the time children have grown up being educated inheir refugee leaders created their own education program with the support of organizations including the united nations. this is one of the people responsible. her group set up some 150 schools from nurseries to colleges at seven refugee camps in thailand. >> nearly over 60 years we can survive because of education. if not we will l
months after the taliban tried to kill her for advocating education for girls. 15-year-old malala yousufzai was airlifted there after being shot in the head in october in pakistan's swat valley. today, the hospital in birmingham, england, released video and photographs of malala waving to the staff and hugging her nurses as she left on thursday. for now, she'll stay in britain with her family, and next month, she'll have skull reconstruction surgery. hundreds of thousands of palestinians rallied in gaza today in a rare show of support of the fatah movement there. the yellow flags of fatah were seen waving all over gaza in large squares, in processions, and from rooftops. it was the first such event since the rival group hamas seized power in gaza in 2007. hamas approved today's rally, and its prime minister voiced hopes for reconciling differences over how to deal with israel. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the war in syria reached another grim milestone this week. the united nations estimated that the death toll from the almost two-year
for denying girls an education. in october members of the taliban shot her in the head. malala's father accepted the simone de beauvoir's prize for women's freedom on her behalf at an awards ceremony in ris. he directed some of his comments to the tiban >> they should come to the talks. they should lay down their guns, and they should come to peace and come to humanity. >> organizers projected a photograph of malala and a quote from her onto a screen. she said all she wants is education and she's afraid of no one. doctors sent malala to britain for treatment. a hospital in birmingham released her last week. she's expected to return in the next sever weeks for another operion. >>> politics in pakistan is heading for a game changing moment. former sporting hero is winning fans with his fierce stance against u.s. military policy. >> reporter: the 60-year-old is in pakistan. across the country, tens and thousands wait to hear him speak. he once became famous on the field of pakistan's most popular sport, cricket. as captain of the national team in 1992, he thrilled the nation when pakistan
, public investments and everything from sewers and infrastructure over all the education all of that will be cut and may be cut quite dramatically. the oer thing that worries me, jeffrey, is that there was no agreement on the debt kreiling which means that we're likely to see a continuation of this trench warfare we've had in washington at least since the summer of 2011 with almost no hesitation i think that the republicans in the 113th congress will use the threat of not going along with a rise in the debt ceiling as a way of extracting more concessions with regard to spending cuts. some of the spending cuts, as i said, particularly with regard to infrastructure and safety net programs, programs for the poor, are very critical for the future. >> brown: doug holtz-eakin, i guess there's consensus there's more to come, right? >> no question, we got a mixed bag. it got us past theliff and the biggest thing is addition by subtraction. we have a recession, that's the best news. for 98% of the taxpayers it gave them a permanent current tax law and took uncertainty out. but from an
-profit school i.t.t. educational services. the school agreed to pay $46 million to s.l.m., known as sallie mae. sallie mae had sued, arguing i.t.t. owed itoney f stude loans ing bad. i.t.t. educational lost almost a fifth of its market value, with shares dropping 19.3%. this is more than a 10 year low. s.l.m. slipped 0.6%. four of the five most actively traded exchange traded products were lower. the lone winner was the nasdaq 100 tracking fund, up a fraction. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> tom: tonight's word on the street: electronics. beginning tomorrow in las vegas, the newest computers, smart- phones, televisions, just about any high tech gadget you can think of will be on display at the consumer electronics show. intel is among the companies hoping to make a splash. intel is-- intel is paging a big splash this year, james roger is with thestreet.com. he joins us from the nsye. they wrapped up what it will preview the show in las vegas what did you learn. >> there were big announcements there. first i will talk about one thing we didn'tee. we didn't see a big set-top box announce
education and immigration reform. issues that could be held hostage until the spending fights are over. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: other changes could soon be in store for washington: treasury secretary timothy geithner will leave the administration before the end of the month according to sources talking with bloomberg. that would mean geithner would leave as president obama and congress continue negotiating raising the nation's debt ceiling. geithner is the only remaining original member of president obama's economic team. the federal reserve is looking to end its bond buying programs this year, but there's no agreement as to when. minutes of the central bank's december meeting released today, show division among policymakers about when to stop the strategy. the federal reserve has been buying $85 billion worth of government mortgage-backed bonds per month in its effort to drive down long term interest rates. some on the fed want to stop, "well before the end of 2013." that sent stocks lower, the dow closed down 21 points, the nasdaq lost almost 12, and the s&p fell t
term crucial to that is education. one of the important indicators to watch which we don't spend enough time watching is what's happening to the educational attainment of the polation and did it rise in this recession as it did in the great depression when people couldn't find work. there's early reasons to hope that it did though probably not as robust as the great depression when people could go to high school which was free, this time they have to go to college, which is not free for most people. >> rose: austan, looking back over the years from 2008 to 2012 and you left a little bit before that, what would you like to redo and would you consider it wiser to have it politically feasible-- big if-- to add 1.3 trillion stimulus to w no tax cuts? >> i don't know the answer. i thought about the context of what was in the stimulus. we know that there was some disagreement among economists of are we talking art a short recession or are we talk about a long recession? so there was a bit of a mixture, there was some short run things like chraung and there were longer -- cash for clunkers and
and demogrhic facrs as mch. we do see differences in terms of education so there were some things with the study showing differences with education, with support at home could be a factor with that. it's important to keep in mind there are a number of factors that are not just related to psychiatric illness but stressors, culture, support, support at home, supports with school and those involved with the child or adolescent. >> doctor timothy lineberry of the mayo clinic psychiatric hospital and dr. daly of drexel university thank you both so much. >> thank you. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": requiring a search warrant for a blood test; reducing troop levels in afghanistan to zero; using robots as therapy; fighting the flu and denying major stars entry to the hall of fame. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: president obama is ready to name a new treasury secretary-- his own chief of staff, jack lew. it was widely reported today that the announcement will come tomorrow. lew played a key role in the recent fiscal cliff negotiations with congr
about priorities. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> 36 years ago, alex haley published his amazing family saga "roots," tracing his ancestry back to people to slave ships from africa. it later became a landmark mini- series on television and caused thousands, maybe millions, of people to start their own roots search. one of our friends eventually arranged a massive family reunion where he presented each family with a 70-page booklet he had compiled about their history. i was working in commercial television at the time haley did his book tour and he came to our station for an interview. to what do you attribute your exceptional success? the interviewer asked. haley thought for a moment and then said this, "decide what you want. decide what you're willing to give up to get it." do you have sentences in your head that never go away? i do, and none has been more meaningful to me than this one. i've been fortunate. i have had wonderful success in many areas in my life. when i get in trouble, though, is when i try to do too much. i take on task upon task upon task and start thin
moved forward on education reform. penn yetta, the new president is a big proponent of energy reform. mexico has a lot of potential it is not tapping at present. >> tom: we mentioned the price performance that the exchange rate had, outperformed the united states, and you think it can still continue to build on those gains. >> i think the u.s. needs to be there for mexico to outperform. as long as the u.s. economy keeps growing, mexico should keep growing. >> tom: so it is really the united states helping to pull mexico up? >> and mexican labor costs, when you adjust for productivity have been held flat over the next decade. china has seen its labor costs escalate, and the two have pretty close to met. so mexico is much more competitive on a cost basis, and it is here. >> tom: just across the border. finally, that brings us to the united states. how does the u.s. look compared to the rest of the world? >> i think we are still looking okay if we can get past this budget. >> tom: you're less excited about america than you are about non-japan asia. >> i'm really excited about non-japan
civilians with similar levels of education and experience. the obama administration has already used up the easiest savings in the defense budget, but it hasn't taken on personnel costs. as a veteran and a former head of the u.s.o., hagel might have the clout to bring military pay raises in line with what's happening in the st othe onomy. >> and when people talk about, oh, what the impact of this or that on military families, "you say, wait a second, i saved the u.s.o. from bankruptcy. so i know military families." and so, i think that is one area he can work on that has been politically toxic for any of his predecessors. >> reporter: there are still big savings to be found in cutting weapons systems-- in particular, the nation's nuclear arsenal. reducing the number of nuclear submarines, bombers and missiles could cut the defense budget by $10 billion a year. and a republican secretary of defense may give the president additional cover to seek those cuts, which is why defense companies are worried. >> the defense industry understands that military budgets are going to continue to be cu
our game on education, maintaining our commit oment to research and development and adding to it, continuing our transformation and energy, grabbing the energy sources of the future and dominating them and developing energy independence. but these things are going to require the appropriate priorities and those are reflected in budgets. if all we do is rachet down, you know, essentiay cle the government down for all intents and purposes so that we're not attending to these things, we're going to have a much less good future so how that debate comes out is important. but there are other issues, immigration reform this very important gun dekbats we're having. the, you know, how we effectuate the transition in health care to the health-care reform. there are a lot of issues on which you know, we have to get it right. and he is going to provide the leadership that we need to get it right i believe. >> here's one issue. theodore roosevelt talked about the bully pulpit where it was used. we saw another issue of bill clinton at the convention with the ca passit ot explain and the presid
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)